Yokohama

“He found himself at first in a thoroughly European quarter, the houses having low fronts, and being adorned with verandas, beneath which he caught glimpses of neat peristyles. This quarter occupied, with its streets, squares, docks, and warehouses, all the space between the ‘promontory of the Treaty’ and the river [. . . ]were mixed crowds of all races, Americans and English, Chinamen and Dutchmen, mostly merchants ready to buy or sell anything.”

– Jules Verne, Around the World in 80 Days

Jules Verne’s Around the World in 80 Days is a revealing primary source that that elucidates how 19th century Europeans understood the many peoples and cultures of the world. Strikingly, even before rapid globalized communication, Verne is able to give an accurate depiction of Yokohama, a westernized Japanese treaty port. A 19th century traveler would be hard pressed to find fault in both Verne’s depictions of Yokohama’s landmarks and multicultural flare. However, it must be noted that Verne was unable to accurately capture the nuanced reason for Yokohama’s rapid westernization. Ultimately, because of this book’s cultural and historical importance it is necessary to investigate its deceptions of Yokohama’s landmarks, multiculturalism, and westernization.

Landmarks and other Facts

Photo Credit: Sorene, Paul.  The Barbarians Arrive: Japanese Depiction of Westerners (1860s). FlashBak, October 10th, 2015. This photo shows a U. S. Steamship in the Japanese Harbor. The picture also shows how Japanese people pictured Americans and Westerners in general. Click here to find out more about the Landmarks and other Facts.

Westernization

Photo Credit:  Sorene, Paul.  The Barbarians Arrive: Japanese Depiction of Westerners (1860s). FlashBak, October 10th, 2015. This picture shows a Merchants house in Japan.  Click here to find out more about Japanese Westernization. 

Multiculturalism

 

Photo Credit: Sorene, Paul.  The Barbarians Arrive: Japanese Depiction of Westerners (1860s). FlashBak, October 10th, 2015. This picture shows a Western ship in the Japanese harbor. Click here to find out more about Multiculturalism