British Influence

British Influence

The Suez Canal was of great importance to Britain over the last century. The canal “provided Great Britain with a shorter sea route to its empire and as the 20th century came, it became a shorter passage for British oil from the Persian Gulf” ( Milner, 2011, p.1). Britain took control of the canal when Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli bought “Egypt’s shareholding for four million pounds” in mid 1870 (Milner, 2011, p.1). The Bristish maintained their control of the Suez Canal until 1956.  Learn more about British influence and control at:

A Handbook for Travellers in Egypt 1873

This 626 page book has all necessary information and then some for all adventurers wanting to experience Egypt in the mid 1870’s.  The book starts with the best season to travel in, what to expect on a journey from England to Egypt, and things that should be bought in England for the Nile journey. The book then has a section on Egypt climate, ways of life, history and English to Arabic vocabulary. Additionally, there are route and travel sections on Alexandria, Cairo, the Nile River, Thebes, and Nubia. Maps of all major cities and the entire country of Egypt are also included.

According to the book, Mr. Fogg took the third route which was across France, but he went to Brindisi instead of Marseilles.